About Michael Hughes

Board Certified Ocularist

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Michael Hughes, a Board Certified Ocularist, began working in prosthetics in 1982. Michael is a native of Pennsylvania and attended Bucknell University in Lewisburg with the Pennsylvania Governor’s School for the Arts. He continued his education at Pennsylvania State University, majoring in fine arts. Michael obtained a certificate in maxillofacial prosthetics technology from the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Wilmington, Delaware (in conjunction with Temple University).

Michael Hughes served with the Veterans Administration in St. Louis and Washington, D.C., as Chief of the Artificial Eye and Restorations Clinic before settling into the suburban Washington, D.C. area. His primary office is located in Vienna, Virginia, with offices also in Richmond, Roanoke, and Charlottesville. Michael is the principle ocularist at the University of Virginia.

Michael Hughes was awarded a Fellow member to the American Society of Ocularists in 2014 and has held numerous positions with the American Society of Ocularists. He has been a prolific writer regarding prosthetic eyes, contributing articles to numerous professional books and journals. The history of the profession holds special interest for Michael Hughes.

About Neill Hughes

Ocularist

Neill Hughes is a native of Northern Virginia and graduated from Gonzaga College High School in Washington, D.C. He attended both Miami University and Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. He works in Vienna, Virginia with his father, Michael Hughes, as well as the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.

Neill is a member of the American Society of Ocularists and is actively participating in their professional educational program.

Of special interest to Neill Hughes is a charitable comprehensive ophthalmological mission to Central America known as Eye Care International. Neill travels annually to El Salvador with Eye Care International to help the underserved in poor and rural communities. As a member of this mission work, Neill creates custom-made prosthetic eyes for a diverse community.

For additional information regarding Eye Care International, visit their website: www.eyecarint.org

For a brief review of the prosthetic work provided in El Salvador, click HERE

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History of the Artificial Eye Clinic

Michael Hughes

Michael Hughes relocated from Philadelphia to Northern Virginia in 1991. He absorbed Bill Dubois’ practice (of Bethesda) in 1992, and collaborated with Clyde Andrews (of Richmond) starting in 1994. In 1999, Artificial Eye Clinic assumed Langdon Henderlite’s practice, servicing the needs of patients in Southwest Virginia and West Virginia.

William F. “Bill” Dubois

William F. “Bill” Dubois 82, who for more than 30 years owned and operated the Contact Lens and Artificial Eye Service in Washington and then Bethesda, died March 26 at his home in Naples, Fla. He had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Mr. Dubois was born in Washington. He graduated from Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring and Washington College in Chestertown, MD. He served in the Army during World War II and the Korean War. He helped develop an artificial plastic eye and later served as the officer in charge of the plastic eye clinic at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. After leaving the Army in the 1950’s, he owned and operated the Contact Lens and Artificial Eye Service until retiring in 1991. He was a former lieutenant governor of the Maryland Optimist Clubs, president of Manor Country Club and a member of the American Legion post in Boyds. His avocations include golf. In 1993, he moved from Rockville to Florida. Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Gwen Dubois of Naples; a daughter, Karen Rhea of Boyds; and two grandsons.

Langdon M. Henderlite

Langdon Henderlite, who was a Richmond native, was born to Langdon M. Henderlite, Ph.D.DD. and Courtney Edmond (Frischkorn) on April 12, 1925. Langdon’s father was a missionary, and he spent considerable time in Brazil, South America. Langdon’s first visit to Brazil was at age five, and he attended school in both Brazil and in Richmond.
Langdon was hired at Galeski Optical as an apprentice in 1953. Along with Clyde Andrews, Mary Holt and Bob French, Langdon was an important contributor to the infamous “Galeski Eye.” In 1955, to service the needs of Galeski’s growing clientele, Langdon was designated the “traveling eye man” for Galeski. A few of his travel points included: Norfolk, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Bluefield, West Virginia and Huntington, West Virginia.

The 1950’s and 1960’s were an incredible changing climate for ocular prostheses. Stock glass prostheses were still being fitted, and the area of western Virginia and West Virginia relied on stock prostheses. The traveling eye man was very welcome to the ophthalmic community in these areas. Langdon continued to be a significant eye maker in Richmond and the surrounding area, and became a member of the American Society of Ocularists in 1960, three years after its inception. He became board certified in 1980. With Galeski Optical soon to be sold to a Canadian optical company, Langdon left Galeski Optical and formed his own practice in downtown Roanoke in 1980. He assumed Ludwig Hussar’s (the Hungarian dentist) ocular prosthetic practice from Oak Hill, West Virginia in 1981, and briefly collaborated with Pittsburgh and Morgantown, West Virginia ocularist Walter “Bud” Tillman in 1981-82. Langdon continued to work in Roanoke until 1989, when he semi-retired into New Castle, Virginia. His “retirement” came a few years later in 1998 when Michael O. Hughes assumed his practice in southwestern Virginia. Langdon enjoyed a forty-five year career in the field of making custom ocular prosthetics. He is fondly remembered as “Red” (for his orange-red hair) and for his humor and compassion for those distraught over having lost their eye.

Langdon Henderlite memorium from the 2009 Journal of Ophthalmic Prostheticsicon-file-text 

Presidential Certificate of Achievement from the American Society of Ocularists: Awarded to Clyde Andrewsicon-file-text 

My Work as an Eyemaker: The First 55 yearsicon-file-text 
Clyde Andrews
Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 2005

Journal Articles and Book Contributions

Senior Editor
Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Official Journal for the American Society of Ocularists, 2005-2010

From the Senior Editor 2011icon-file-text 
From the Senior Editor 2010icon-file-text 
From the Senior Editor 2009icon-file-text 
From the Senior Editor 2008icon-file-text 
From the Senior Editor 2007icon-file-text 
From the Senior Editor 2006icon-file-text 
From the Senior Editor 2005icon-file-text 

Fitting for a Migrated Guyton Implanticon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes and Joe LeGrand, Jr.
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 1989

Advances in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: The Anophthalmic Socket (Stephen Bosniak, M.D. and Byron Smith, M.D.)
Michael O. Hughes and Joe LeGrand, Jr.

Empirical Impressions Technique for Artificial Eye Fittingicon-file-text 
Pergaman Press, 1990, 118-125

New Ideas – A Fitting Tip: Wax Impression Traysicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 1992

Custom Radiation Shields (For Using During Electron Beam Irradiation)
A Case Reporticon-file-text 

Michael O. Hughes and Robert Kling, M.D.
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 1994

Acrylic Scleral Shell Spacer to Prevent Skin Damage During Gamma Knife Radiosurgery of Ocular Melanomaicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes; Brian Conway, M.D.; Joni Hennofer, R.N.; Dheerendra Phasad, M.D.; and Ladislau E. Steiner, M.D., Ph.D.
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 1996

The Galeski Prosthesisicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 1999

Predicting the Ideal Implant Size Before Enucleationicon-file-text 
Jeffrey L. Jacobs, M.D.; Sara Kaltreider, M.D.; Michael O. Hughes
Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
1999, Volume 15, No. 1, 37-43

The Galeski Eyeicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
Ophthalmic Antiques International Journal
Middlesex England; Spring, 2000

Eye Making: A Brief History of Artificial Eyes Made in Virginia, Washington D.C., and Surrounding Areasicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
Promotional Booklet
July, 2000

Two Almost Forgotten Soldiers: The Story of Ludwig Hassar and Leon Schlossbergicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 2000

Microphthalmia in Russian Orphanagesicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 2002

Flying Engineer Teaches Thousands to See With One Eye: The 30-Year Backgound of the Book, A Singular Viewicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes, Julius Axelford, Ph.D. (Nobel Laureate)
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 2003

A Singular View, The Art of Seeing With One Eye
Frank Brady, ISBN: 0-9614639-2-9
Editor/Publisher, Michael O. Hughes
www.asingularview.com
2004-2010. Spanish edition 2008

Reprint: Flying Engineer Teaches Thousands to See With One Eye: The 30-Year Background of the Book, A Singular View
Michael O. Hughes, Julius Axelrod, Ph.D. (Nobel Laureate)
The Journal of Facial and Somato Prosthetics
Volume 10, Number 1

Reprint: Flying Engineer Teaches Thousands to See With One Eye: The 30-Year Background of the Book, A Singular View
Michael O. Hughes, Julius Axelrod, Ph.D. (Nobel Laureate)
Insight, Journal of the American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses
July-September, 2004, Volume XXIX, No. 3, 30-32.

Anatomy of the Anterior Eye for Ocularistsicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 2004

Bilateral Evisceration: A Case Reporticon-file-text William K. Blaylock, M.D., Suzanne C. Johnston, M.D., Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 10. No. 1
Fall, 2005. Pages 23-27.

Depicting the Anterior Aspect of the Human Eye in Two and Three Dimension, Part One: Cornea and Pupil
Michael O. Hughes and Craig Luce
Journal of Biocommunication (Journal of the Association of Medical Illustrators)
September, 2005, Volume 31, Number 1

Depicting The Anterior Aspect of the Human Eye in Two and Three Dimension, Part Two: Iris, Limbus and Sclera
Michael O. Hughes and Craig Luce
Journal of Biocommunication (Journal of the Association of Medical Illustrators)
November, 2005, Volume 31, Number 2

Ocular Implants and Orbital Reconstruction: Two Follow-up Casesicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 11. No. 1
Fall, 2006. Pages 27-31.

A Pictorial Anatomy of the Human Eye/Anophthalmic Socket: A Review for Ocularistsicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 12. No. 1
Fall, 2007. Pages 51-63.

Eye Injuries and Prosthetic Resotration in the American Civil War Yearsicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 13. No. 1
Fall, 2008. Pages 17-28.

Lee Allen, Ocularisticon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes, Elsie Joy, Steven Young
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 14. No. 1
Fall, 2009. Pages 13-25.

Additional Comments Regarding the Lee Allen Tribute Journalicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 14. No. 1
Fall, 2009. Pages vi-vii.

Incorporating Gold into Ocular Prostheticsicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 15. No. 1
Fall, 2010. Pages 31-43.

Perquin, El Salvador, 2010
EyeCare Mission:
Two Weeks, 3,052 Patients
icon-file-text 

Beth Ault-Brinker, M.D., Darrell W. Holland, Phil Loar, Padre Paul E. Schindler
Editorial comments: Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 2010

The Fourth “O” in Eye Care—Ocularists
Michael Hughes
The American Medical Association:
Virtual Mentor
.2010; 12:950-954
http://virtualmentor.ama-assn.org/2010/12/imhl1-1012.html
Accessed December 3, 2010

Evisceration of the Human Eye with Ocular Prosthetic Restorationicon-file-text 
Michael O. Hughes, Jeffrey J. Zuravleff, M.D.
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall, 2011

Web article, complete with glossary, short animation and audio
American Society of Ocularists
http://abipropub.com/eye/, Accessed October 2011.

Forty Years of Publication:
Professional Journals of the
American Society of Ocularists, 1972-2012

Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 17. No. 1.
Fall, 2012. Pages 1-6

A Three-Dimensional Model for
Teaching Patients about Eye Loss and
Prosthesis Wear

Michael O. Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 17. No. 1
Fall, 2012. Pages 13-22.

Discarded Items: A Photograph and Glass Eye Gives Clues to the Past
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics, Volume 18. No. 1.
Fall 2013. Pages 53-57.

MINE
What small things hold meaning for you?

The Washington Post – Style Magazine
Michael O. Hughes
Sunday, August 10, 2014. Page 13.

Anophthalmic Syndrome: A review of management
Christopher T. Shah, M.D.;
Michael O. Hughes, B.C.O., Maria Kirzhner, M.D.
Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
2014, Vol 30, No 5. 361-365.

Visual Field Deficits After Eye Loss: What do Monocular Patients (NOT) see?
Michael O. Hughes, Neill Hughes
The Journal of Ophthalmic Prosthetics
Fall 2014. Pages 19-26.

A glimpse back: How a photograph and a glass eye gave clues to the past
American Digger: The magazine for Diggers and Collectors
March-April, 2015; Vol 11, Issue 2. Pages 54-56.

Reprint: Visual Field Deficits After Eye Loss: What do Monocular Patients (NOT) see?
Michael O. Hughes, Neill Hughes
Insight, Journal of the American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses
April – May, 2015 Volume